Emory community unites against racist violence

Emory community unites against racist violence

From the Emory Quadrangle to hospitals to homes around the world, thousands of members of the Emory community came together Friday to protest racist violence and recommit to working for a more just future.


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Emory College AAE hosts virtual book club featuring faculty authors

A virtual book club featuring works by Emory College faculty kicks off Thursday, June 4, with Tayari Jones discussing her New York Times bestseller “An American Marriage.” The discussion will begin at 7 p.m.

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Behavioral studies in era of COVID-19 raise new concerns about diversity

COVID-19 is accelerating an ongoing trend in cognitive psychology to conduct human behavioral experiments online. Emory psychologists find that while the Internet offers a powerful tool for collecting data during a time of social distancing, it also raises new concerns regarding the diversity of study participants.

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Four students honored with Emory Libraries’ undergraduate research awards

Four students were recognized by the Robert W. Woodruff Library for undergraduate research they conducted either in the Emory Libraries or at another library in conjunction with their class studies.

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All Hands on Deck: The Zoom experts

A team of five tech specialists has served as Emory’s go-to Zoom experts during the COVID-19 pandemic, helping ensure that lines of communication stay strong as the Emory community continues to work, teach, learn and provide patient care.

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'Health Behind Locked Doors' course explores incarceration, institutionalization

Spring semester began with human health lecturer Jennifer Sarrett focusing on the physical and mental health concerns of people living in prisons, jails and disability-related institutions. Like many Emory faculty, she adapted her course to include COVID-19.

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Scientists identify chemicals in noxious weed that 'disarm' deadly bacteria

In a study led by Emory ethnobotanist Cassandra Quave, scientists have identified specific compounds from the Brazilian peppertree that reduce the virulence of antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria.