Concerts and conversations highlight December arts programs

Emory Report | Nov. 25, 2020

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One highlight of arts events will be the Fall Composition Showcase on Dec. 8, a virtual concert with student composers demonstrating works they created under the mentorship of Emory faculty.

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Celebrate this holiday season with a cozy line-up of virtual Arts at Emory events, including the conclusion of a yearlong celebration of Beethoven’s 250th birthday by the Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta (ECMSA).

Science Gallery Atlanta’s new virtual series, Connect and Cope, joins student mediators with arts professionals as they explore various aspects of coping mechanisms. The series continues into December with guest speakers Dion Liverpool and Gary Motley (Friday, Dec. 4), Abigail Lott (Wednesday, Dec. 9), Jordan Braunig (Monday, Dec. 14) and Bobbi Patterson (Friday, Dec. 18). All programs begin at 4 p.m. and can be watched on Science Gallery Atlanta’s YouTube page.

The EMCSA concludes its yearlong celebration of Beethoven’s 250th birthday with a virtual concert of his Violin Sonata No. 10 on Friday, Dec 4, at 12 p.m. on the Schwartz Center Virtual Stage. The program will feature David Coucheron and William Ransom, along with members of the Vega String Quartet performing the String Trio in C Minor. The event is free and open to the public with no registration required.

On Tuesday, Dec. 8, the Emory Music Department presents the Fall Composition Showcase, a virtual concert in which student composers demonstrate their new works created under the mentorship of Emory faculty. With solo and small chamber compositions, the evening features recordings and remote performances on the virtual stage. The event begins at 8 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

The Emory University Center for Ethics and the Emory College Center for Creativity and Arts proudly invite the Emory community to join the Arts & Social Justice Fellowship Project Showcase and Community Conversation on Tuesday, Dec. 15, at 12 p.m. The fellowship program brings six Atlanta artists dedicated to working toward racial justice into Emory classrooms to help students translate their learning into creative action and activism. Join in the discussion as the program’s inaugural cohort shares the results of their collaboration with the community. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.