Australian diplomat to speak on Australia's role in U.S.-China relations

The Halle Institute | Sep. 11, 2013

Contact

Erin Crews
404-727-7467
erin.crews@emory.edu

Elaine Justice
404.727.0643
elaine.justice@emory.edu

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Former Australian Ambassador Rawdon Dalrymple will visit Emory to deliver a talk on Australia's role in US-China relations in the Asia-Pacific region. (Photo: National Library of Australia.)

Rawdon Dalrymple, former Australian ambassador to the United States, will deliver a public talk titled “Accepting China as a Great Power: Are We Caught in the Middle? A View from Australia” on Thursday, Sept. 19 at Emory University. Presented by Emory’s Halle Institute for Global Learning, the event will begin at 4 p.m. in the Joseph W. Jones Room of Robert W. Woodruff Library, 540 Asbury Circle.

Dalrymple will discuss Australia’s options for managing its strategic and cultural ties with the United States while maintaining its significant economic relationship with China.

A former Rhodes Scholar and graduate of Oxford University, Dalrymple served in Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade from 1957 to 1994. During the course of his career, he has served as ambassador to Israel, Indonesia, the United States and Japan. In 1985, he was appointed deputy secretary and awarded the insignia of Officer in the Order of Australia. He has published extensively on Australia's international relations while chairing various boards and councils on Asia-Pacific issues.

Admission to the lecture is free, but guests should register to attend.

Event parking
Parking is available in the Fishburne Deck, 1672 North Decatur Rd.

About the Halle Institute
Established in 1997 with a gift from Claus M. Halle, the Halle Institute for Global Learning is Emory’s premier venue for visits by heads of state, distinguished policymakers and influential public intellectuals from around the world. The Halle Institute’s programs strengthen faculty distinction, prepare engaged scholars and foster greater involvement from local, national and international communities.