Renowned cardiologist receives inaugural award from American College of Cardiology

Woodruff Health Sciences Center | March 12, 2013

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Internationally recognized as a leading authority on coronary heart disease in women, Dr. Nanette Wenger has accumulated dozens of prestigious awards throughout her career.

Her legendary contribution in the advancement of cardiovascular medicine is unparalleled. Now the American College of Cardiology has honored Nanette K. Wenger, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine, with its inaugural 2013 Distinguished Mentor Award in recognition of her dedication to mentorship and tremendous role in shaping the careers of current and future leaders in cardiology.

Dr. Wenger received the award at the Convocation of the College’s 62nd Annual Scientific Sessions in San Francisco on March 11, 2013.

"Throughout my career, mentoring women and men in cardiology, including students, residents, cardiology trainees, faculty, and community physicians, has been equally a passion and a reward," says Wenger. "The science and practice of cardiology will be advanced by its emerging leaders, and it has been my privilege to contribute to their progress."

Internationally recognized as a leading authority on coronary heart disease in women, Wenger has accumulated dozens of prestigious awards throughout her career. Her greatest legacy is changing the face of cardiology. In 1993, Wenger coauthored a landmark article in the New England Journal of Medicine that aggressively addressed the prejudice that heart disease was a man's disease. Research led by Wenger resulted in significant changes to the way drugs and hormones for women are tested and prescribed.

Wenger's association with the American College of Cardiology spans over half a century. A native of New York City and a graduate of Hunter College and the Harvard Medical School, Wenger received her medical and cardiology training at Mount Sinai Hospital before coming to Emory University and Grady Memorial Hospital in 1958. Since then she has been a trailblazer and icon in the field of cardiology as author and co-author of more than 1,400 scientific and review articles and book chapters.

Wenger helped write the 2011 Guidelines for Preventing Cardiovascular Disease in Women. In 2009, her fiftieth year at Emory, Wenger’s extraordinary career achievements were celebrated with the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American College of Cardiology.

Wenger serves on the editorial boards of numerous professional journals and is a sought after lecturer for issues related to heart disease in women, heart disease in the elderly, cardiac rehabilitation, coronary prevention and contemporary cardiac care.