November features virtual concerts, artist lectures and live reading of 'Sovereignty'

Emory Report | Oct. 27, 2020

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During November, celebrate the cooler weather through a handful of virtual Arts at Emory events across multiple disciplines, including a lecture on late-16th-century prints, several concerts including a performance from the Grammy Award–winning ensemble Third Coast Percussion and a live reading of the play “Sovereignty.”

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During November, celebrate the cooler weather through a handful of virtual Arts at Emory events across multiple disciplines, including a lecture on late-16th-century prints, several concerts including a performance from the Grammy Award–winning ensemble Third Coast Percussion and a live reading of the play “Sovereignty.”

Music

Music lovers can enjoy a continuation of the EMCSA (Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta) Beethoven series on Sunday, Nov. 1, with a Beethoven Lecture by Bill McGlaughlin at 1 p.m. That same evening, the Vega Quartet will conclude its exploration of the complete Beethoven String Quartets at 4 p.m. Both virtual performances are free and open to the public. As part of the Cooke Noontime Series, the Beethoven Violin and Cello Sonatas will be shared from the virtual stage of First Presbyterian Church on Friday, Nov. 20, at 12 p.m.

The Schwartz Center Virtual Stage proudly hosts the Grammy Award–winning, Chicago-based percussion quartet Third Coast Percussion on Friday, Nov. 13, at 8 p.m. In this exclusive concert from Chicago, the ensemble performs works from “Perpetulum,” a score by renowned composer Philip Glass. The event is free and open to the public but reservations are required

Violinist Claudia Schaer, Canadian recitalist, soloist and chamber musician, will perform a free virtual concert on Monday, Nov. 16, at 7:30 p.m. Schaer distinguished herself from an early age, earning Calgary’s Most Promising Violinist medal when only 11 years old. She has received numerous awards for her work and received high acclaim for her 2014 recording of the Bach Sonatas and Partias. The Oxford Studies event is open to all Emory students, faculty and staff.

Michael C. Carlos Museum

The Michael C. Carlos Museum continues its celebration of Indigenous peoples with a live reading of “Sovereignty,” a play exploring the politics and struggles of the Cherokee Nation, on Sunday, Nov. 8, at 2 p.m. Registration is required. 

The play follows two parallel timelines, interweaving scenes from a present-day court battle and the 1835 conflicts that led to the brutality of the Andrew Jackson administration. Taking as its point of departure the story of one lawyer’s passionate defense of her people’s right to prosecute non-natives who commit crimes on reservations, “Sovereignty” opens up into an expansive exploration of the circularity of history, human memory and the power of human relationships.

“Sovereignty” is made possible through the generous financial support of Georgia Humanities Council and in collaboration with the Decatur Book Festival. Proceeds from the reading will support opportunities for Native American students at the Carlos Museum.

Film and theater

As part of the Visiting Artists series by Photography at Emory, the Department of Film and Media hosts Dehanza Rogers for a virtual program on Tuesday, Nov. 10, at 1 p.m

This series of free artist’s talks focuses in and around photography, film, video, art and activism. Rogers is an assistant professor in the Department of Film and Media at Emory and a director of both documentary and narrative films. Her films have screened at more than 100 festivals around the world, as well on PBS and cable TV. Her latest project, #BlackGirlhood, explores the criminalization of Black girls in schools and was partially funded by Eastern State Penitentiary’s Criminal Justice Today grant.

Theater artist, writer and professor Kimberly Dark will offer a virtual performance on Wednesday, Nov. 4, at 7:30 p.m. The author of “Fat, Pretty and Soon to Be Old” has the ability to make the personal political, grounded in her training as a sociologist. The free Oxford Studies event is open to all Emory students, faculty and staff.

Art history

Join the Art History department for a fascinating lecture titled “Renaissance Invention: The Newberry’s Nova Reperta.” Lia Markey, director of the Center for Renaissance Studies, and Suzanne Karr Schmidt, the George Amos Poole III Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts at the Newberry Library, both present on “Nova Reperta” (New Discoveries), one of the most famous and widely disseminated print series of the late 16th century. The “Nova Reperta” is featured in the Newberry’s exhibition “Renaissance Invention.” 

The virtual lecture, held Thursday, Nov. 12, at 6 p.m., is free and open to the public.