Grammy-winning Kronos Quartet debuts Emory's 2019-2020 arts season

Emory Report | Aug. 29, 2019

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The Grammy Award-winning Kronos Quartet will open Emory’s 2019-2020 arts season on Sept. 14 with a concert featuring Iranian vocalist Mahsa Vahdat. Photo credit: Evan Neff

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This September, Emory welcomes the Kronos Quartet and Iranian vocalist Mahsa Vahdat to campus to ring in a new season of arts events. Other notable events this month include a live reading of Homer’s “The Iliad” and two performances by feminist rap cabaret artist Boyfriend. Visit the Arts at Emory calendar for a full listing of events.

Music

Grammy Award-winning Kronos Quartet explores musical traditions and soundscapes with music from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. Featuring Iranian vocalist Mahsa Vahdat, the program highlights the rich diversity of artistic voices from Muslim-majority countries. They will perform in the Emerson Concert Hall at the Schwartz Center for Performing Arts on Saturday, Sept. 14, at 8 p.m. Tickets are on sale now. 

Film

In collaboration with the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival, Emory presents five of the best films screened at AJFF over the past few years. Films include “Go for Zucker” (2004), “Monkey Business: The Adventures of Curious George’s Creators” (2017), “Bethlehem” (2013) and “Olympic Pride, American Prejudice” (2016). See the films in White Hall Sept. 15 through Sept. 17.

Creative Writing

Poet Robyn Schiff opens the Creative Writing Program Reading Series on Monday, Sept. 16, at 6:30 p.m. She is the author of three poetry collections, “Worth,” “Revolver,” and “A Woman of Property.” A book-length poem, “Information Desk: An Epic,” is forthcoming from Penguin in 2021. The reading takes place in the Jones Room in the Woodruff Library, and it is free and open to the public. 

Dance

This fall, the Emory Dance Program hosts guest artist Dafi Altabeb for a semester-long residency. Altabeb is a musician, dancer and choreographer whose impressive career includes performances in major international venues. On Thursday, Sept. 19, hear Altabeb speak about her work in a Rosemary Magee Creativity Conversation. The conversation takes place at 7:30 p.m. in the Dance Studio at the Schwartz Center for Performing Arts. The event is free and open to the public.

Theater

Feminist rap cabaret artist Boyfriend brings her touring music act, featuring a live band and dancers, to the Mary Gray Munroe Theater on Friday, Sept. 27, and Saturday, Sept. 28, at 7 p.m. The event is free to attend. 

Carlos Museum

Join artist and founder of the Atlanta BeltLine Lantern Parade Chantelle Ryder at the Michael C. Carlos Museum for the fourth annual Carlos Museum Lantern Workshop on Friday, Sept. 6, at 6:30 p.m. Find inspiration in images of birds across the collections, from vultures, falcons and ibis in the Egyptian galleries to Athena’s owl in the Greek galleries, and the condor, osprey and raven in the Americas. Then, enjoy a glass of wine and create a bird-inspired globe lantern to carry in the 10th annual Lantern Parade on Saturday, Sept. 21. Reserve your ticket today.

By popular demand, the Carlos Museum and Theater Emory will present a three-day live reading of Homer’s “The Iliad,” sponsored by Georgia Public Broadcasting. Listen to the famous epic poem September 13 through 15, at the museum. 

University Libraries

“How Might We? Innovation in the Libraries” is the newest exhibit at Woodruff Library. Now through July 2020, "How Might We?" focuses on the culture of creativity and innovation supported by Emory Libraries that inspires better ways of providing information, technology and expertise to students and faculty.

The exhibition includes a Creativity Bar with hands-on activities where visitors can tap into their logic skills and imagination; an overview of resources that foster innovation; a selection of projects that illustrate new or improved ways the Libraries promote research, learning and teaching; and a timeline of significant changes in the role of libraries over the last 150 years. This exhibit is free and open to the public.