Emory Johns Creek Hospital adds new surgical robot for minimally invasive surgery

March 10, 2021

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Alysia Satchel
Senior Manager, Media Relations
alysia.satchel@emoryhealthcare.org

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da Vinci Xi surgical system

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Emory Johns Creek Hospital has added a second da Vinci Xi surgical system to support the growth of robotic surgery at the hospital.

The da Vinci Xi system from Intuitive Surgical, Inc. offers surgeons 3D-HD vision, advanced instrumentation, and greater flexibility for more complex surgery. During robotic-assisted surgery, Emory Johns Creek Hospital specially-trained surgeons sit at a console to view 3D images of the procedure. They use robotic arms to control movements of extremely precise instruments that have been placed through small incisions. The robotic system is used for colon and rectal surgery, general surgery, bariatric surgery, gynecology and urology.

"We’re thrilled to provide this innovative technology to our patients with continued goals of decreasing postoperative pain, reducing postoperative complications, shortening hospital length of stay and reducing recovery time at home," says Seth Rosen, MD, Emory Healthcare colorectal surgeon, associate professor, Emory University School of Medicine and chief of staff at Emory Johns Creek Hospital.

Rosen also serves as chairperson of Emory Healthcare’s Robotic Committee. The group tracks utilization of robotic surgery throughout the hospital system, with a focus on patient safety, surgical quality, resource utilization and total cost of care.

The expansion of Emory Johns Creek Hospital’s robotic surgery program demonstrates the hospital leadership’s commitment to high-quality patient care.

"Our team is dedicated to investing in the best technology to offer our patients top-notch care and help them return safely and quickly to their daily lives," says Marilyn Margolis, MN, RN, Emory Johns Creek Hospital Chief Executive Officer.

Emory Healthcare’s robotic program can be found at five of its hospitals in metro Atlanta. The health care system’s surgeons perform over 2,800 robotic procedures each year, making it one of the largest robotic programs in the country.