Emory Autism Center event: Beyond Rainman: Autism on Stage and Screen

Woodruff Health Sciences Center | April 17, 2018

Contact

Jennifer Johnson McEwen
404-727-5696
jennifer.johnson@emory.edu, 

The Emory Autism Center and partners are hosting a free public event at the Emory Brain Health Center on Wednesday, April 18. The event, “Beyond Rainman: Autism on Stage and Screen,” will take a look at the representation of autism on stage and screen.    

The program will feature a keynote address from retired Emory Autism Center staff member, Sheila Wagner. She will discuss her experience consulting on television shows featuring individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). As a consultant to Hollywood Health and Sciences, Wagner has offered consultative advice to a variety of networks including ABC, NBC, USA and Disney.

The event will also feature a panel of teenagers and adults with ASD involved in the performing arts who will share their insights and experiences in drama. The Spectrum Drama Club will perform a scene and a song from their upcoming production of “Into the Woods, Jr.” Light refreshments and seating are available on a first come first served basis.

Location: Emory Brain Health Center, 12 Executive Park, Atlanta, GA 30329

Date & time: Wednesday, April 18. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Event starts at 6:30 pm.  

Parking: Free parking will be available in the deck beside Executive Park 12 building.

No registration is required and the event is open to Emory employees and the general public. Event partners include: Autism Society, Marcus Autism Center, Autism Speaks, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, The Autism Foundation of Georgia, Spectrum and the Atlanta Autism Consortium.

About the Emory Autism Center

The Emory Autism Center is a component of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Emory University School of Medicine. Established in 1991 as a public, private and University collaboration, the center has become a national model providing clinical, educational and medical supports to individuals with autism (ages 15 months through adulthood); providing instructive guidance to their family members; providing training to educators and professionals interested in learning how to better support children and adults with ASD; and providing engaging learning experiences to those in the community who wish to create an inclusive society where one's strengths are valued.