Lubin awarded Master of American College of Physicians

Woodruff Health Sciences Center | April 4, 2013

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Juliette Merchant
404-778-1503
juliette.merchant@emory.edu

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Dr. Michael F. Lubin, professor of medicine at Emory School of Medicine

The American College of Physicians has advanced Michael F. Lubin, MD, professor of medicine at Emory School of Medicine to the level of "Master" - the highest designation given by the organization.  

The Mastership of the American College of Physicians (MACP) honors a small group of highly distinguished fellows of the college, nominated by peers and colleagues, for significant contributions to medical science or the art of medicine.

Masterships will be presented on April 11, 2013 at the American College of Physicians Convocation Ceremony, in San Francisco, California.

Lubin who joined the Emory faculty in 1976 has been involved in teaching residents and students his entire career. He was among the first members of the Division of General Medicine at Grady Memorial Hospital. Since then he has been involved in all aspects of general internal medicine including emergency care, episodic care, continuity care, and intensive care.

Lubin directs the fourth year medicine sub-internship in internal medicine for the Emory School of Medicine and attends in the resident continuity clinic. He also supervises in the Geriatrics clinic and the Preoperative evaluation clinic. Lubin  is the Editor in Chief of Medical Management of the Surgical Patient 2006, published by Cambridge University Press.

"I consider myself very fortunate to have a career that includes both patient care and teaching and to be associated with such an outstanding institution as Emory. Being recognized by my peers in this way is truly icing on the cake. It's a tremendous honor," says Lubin.

Lubin, received his BA in chemistry from Johns Hopkins University and his MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He did his residency in categorical internal medicine at the Emory University Affiliated Programs. 

"I was attracted to the Emory Affiliated Residency Program in internal medicine significantly because of Grady Hospital," says Lubin. "I was in medical School at Johns Hopkins where they had a similar patient population to Grady and enjoyed the work. I came to teaching by accident when I finished my residency and Drs. Hurst and Walker hired me to teach at Grady and reorganize the internal medicine clinic. I loved the work and love caring for patients at Grady. It is the only job I have had."

In 1984 Lubin was a Hartford Scholar in Geriatrics at UCLA for a year and developed the geriatrics clinic at Grady Hospital. He has also been a Health Policy Scholar at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Lubin recently spent four months as Visiting Professor at the University of Tokyo teaching internal medicine to medical students and residents.