Emory celebrates technology and innovation

Woodruff Health Sciences Center | Feb. 29, 2012

Contact

Holly Korschun
404-727-3990
hkorsch@emory.edu

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Illustration: The surface membranes of all cells are coated with sugars linked to proteins and lipids, shown here as the reddish/orange attachments.

The keynote speaker for the Technology Transfer Celebration, Richard D. Cummings, PhD, is an expert in the research field of glycomics, which includes all the body’s complex carbohydrates, or individual sugar molecules responsible for how cells, including viruses and bacteria, adhere to each other. These cellular interactions are important in all aspects of human biology and disease.

WHAT: Office of Technology Transfer, Sixth Annual Celebration of Technology and Innovation, Program and Reception

WHEN: Thursday, March 8, 4:30 p.m.

WHERE: Emory Conference Center, Silver Bell Pavilion, 1615 Clifton Rd., Atlanta, GA 30322

RSVP: ott-web@emory.edu

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Richard D. Cummings, PhD
William P. Timmie Professor and Chair, Department of Biochemistry, Emory University School of Medicine; Co-Director, Emory Center for Glycomics (see biography below).

EMORY ANNUAL CELEBRATION WINNERS 2011:

Start-up of the Year:

Clearside Biomedical
Henry Edelhauser, PhD (Ophthalmology)

Deal of 2011:

Spectropath License for Spectroscopic Intraoperative Tumor Detection System
Shuming Nie, PhD (Biomedical Engineering)

Innovation of 2011:

Mitra-Cath Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair System
Murali Padala, PhD (Surgery)

Significant Event of 2011:

Sale of Pharmasset to Gilead
Raymond Schinazi, PhD (Pediatrics); Dennis Liotta, PhD (Chemistry)

Emory University’s technology transfer program has one of the most robust product pipelines of any university in the country, with one of the nation’s leading programs for guiding technology developed in the laboratory through the patenting and licensing process to the marketplace and into the hands of consumers and patients.

Emory currently manages more than 1,000 technologies invented by its scientists and physicians. This has led to the formation of 57 new companies and the introduction of more than 50 new products to market, some of which, like the discovery of several HIV drugs, have had major societal impact. Royalties earned from sales of new products by Emory licensees have resulted in more than $806 million that has subsidized additional Emory scientific research and education.

For more information, see http://www.ott.emory.edu
Richard Cummings, PhD

Richard Cummings, PhD, an expert in the research field of glycomics, will be the keynote speaker.

Photo by Jack Kearse

Keynote speaker Richard D. Cummings, PhD, is an expert in the research field of glycomics, which includes all the body’s complex carbohydrates, or individual sugar molecules responsible for how cells, including viruses and bacteria, adhere to each other. These cellular interactions are important in all aspects of human biology and disease.

Before joining Emory in 2006, Cummings was the Ed Miller Endowed Chair in Molecular Biology and Biochemstry at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, where he founded the Oklahoma Center for Medical Glycobiology. He received his PhD from Johns Hopkins University and conducted a post-doctoral fellowship at Washington University School of Medicine. While an Associate Professor at the University of Georgia, he was Associate Director of the UGA Complex Carbohydrate Research Center.

In 2008 Cummings founded the Emory Glycomics Center, which he co-directs. He is principal investigator and coordinator of the Glycan Microarray Resources Legacy from the national Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), and he is new chair of the National Institutes of Health-supported CFG. The NIH has continuously supported his research since the early 1980s.

Cummings is co-editor of the textbooks Essentials of Glycobiology and Handbook of Glycomics. He is on the editorial boards of several journals, is the author of more than 230 peer-reviewed manuscripts in the field of glycosciences, and of more than 50 reviews and book chapters. He has received numerous honors for his research, and in 2008 received the Karl Meyer Award from the Society for Glycobiology. He holds more than 30 U.S. patents and was a co-founder of Selexys Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Oklahoma City, which is developing therapeutic antibodies to treat inflammatory diseases. 

For more information about the winners, see: www.ott.emory.edu